A Magical Life: Health, Wealth, and Weight Loss

New You! Who Knew? with David Edwards

July 27, 2022 David Edwards Season 1 Episode 125
A Magical Life: Health, Wealth, and Weight Loss
New You! Who Knew? with David Edwards
Show Notes Transcript

Today I will talk with author David Edwards, author of "New You! Who Knew?" In this episode we will go through my usual 3 questions:
What can your expertise do to accelerate health, be it physical, mental, or emotional?
What are your top 3 tips for creating wealth?
Have you ever battled your weight and what can you share with the listeners about that?

David and I will go on a few rants regarding your internal compass, your internal locus of control, and being true to yourself in all decisions you make.

From David's website biography:
"Hi, I am David R Edwards, author of “New You! Who Knew?”.  A few years ago I was CEO of a Community Health Center creating the leading integrated, person focused, primary care center in the country.  In my interaction with patients, advocates, professionals from different disciplines, and my own pondering and study I had an epiphany, you know a “WOW” moment. People are missing core skills that if they had would make their lives so much better.  I left my well-paying job and embarked on researching and writing a book to help regular people learn the principles and skills needed to become the captain of their own life."

Connect with David:
https://www.davidredwards.com/
amazon.com/author/davidredwards

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Online: https://wholisticnaturalhealth.com.au

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Connect with Magic:
A Magical Life Podcast on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/amagicallifepodcast/
On Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/wholisticnaturalhealth/
Online: https://wholisticnaturalhealth.com.au
A Subito Media production

Magic Barclay:

Welcome back to a magical life. I'm your host magic Barclay today I'm joined by David R. Edwards. David worked his way through school, eventually achieving an MBA in healthcare administration. He served mostly lower income people on three continents over the last 35 years and is familiar with the challenges and unfairness of life in 2018, while working with doctors, dentists, counselors, nurses, community health workers, and others, he had an epiphany. The core challenge most people have is to generate the personal drive, to direct their own life enduring principles, to guide and the most current science based tools to assist them through a bumpy and messy life. His first book knew you who knew is an attempt to put in writing and easy to digest and implement guide that builds confidence esteem. Self-compassion I balance David lives in the Western us with Linda, his wife of 36 years and their golden retriever, Jasper David and Linda have two grown daughters. Welcome David.

David Edwards:

Hi, welcome. nice to meet you.

Magic Barclay:

Lovely to have you here. Now tell us about Jasper

David Edwards:

So he's a four year old golden retriever. My dear wife suffers from pretty severe chronic depression and anxiety. and he's a part of her therapy and he does a fantastic job.

Magic Barclay:

I have to say animals called Jasper have a very large place in my heart because I rescued a kangaroo Joey and named him Jasper and boys. He just, a little being a little so of energy. He's just amazing. Now how old? Well, he's now grown. He's now three years old and wild again, but wow. Was he a pocket rocket when he was in care?

David Edwards:

well, good for you. That's wonderful. Our Jasper, well, not a joy, but, uh, has a similar energy. And he loves, we go for long walks every day. And, uh, oh my gosh. I just love seeing him in nature. He's so connected to it. You know, his nose is to the ground. I'd love to, you know, kind of a picture of what's going on in his brain as he gets all these signals that I will never ever experience in my life. And he's just very engaged and charged.

Magic Barclay:

And I think that's a sad thing about being human. We've lost that like as children, we have that and you can see, you know, a baby taking all that information, even a young child. But as we get older, we lose that amazement for every little thing in life and animals, bring it back to us. And it's great to.

David Edwards:

It is it's wonderful. I read a book a year or two ago called uh, successful aging as every one of us are grateful. Right? We get to live one more day, no matter what our age is. So that's a miracle, that's a wonderful thing. And as we get a few more of those days accumulated, he, this book, he talks about that if you want to remain vital and creative and engaged in life till you know, the end of your life, to try new things, right, try new food, try new experiences, drive a different way to the store, take a different walking route, whatever it is because we really benefit mentally and physically from these different experiences. And it helps us remain vital and, cognitively exercised.

Magic Barclay:

Totally. And hopefully this podcast is some cognitive exercise for people listening. So let's get straight into it. David, I always ask the same three questions of my guests and every guest has a different answer and it's just amazing to see how the human mind can be so diverse. So here comes your first question. What can your expertise do to accelerate health? Be it physical, emotional, or spiritual.

David Edwards:

Thank you. And I love that you include kind of a broader kind of definition of wealth. And as we think of that in our health in general, um, I think. I think of three things first. And I dunno if this is expertise or not, but it's a perspective that I, I strive for, is the belief that I have, that every single person is important. Every single life is important. Most of us won't be rich or famous, well known any of that kind of stuff. And that seems to be a focus of a lot of what we see in here, but that's not the most important things. Right? And so really every life, no matter how common or challenged you have abilities and, and it matters what you do with your life, what you do think, feel experience that's important, cuz it's your life. And everybody can have a satisfying, happy. Of accomplishment, you know, within their own circumstances. And I think that's really critical. I suppose a second is a systems perspective. We were chatting a little bit ago about this idea of systems. And so when I think of a systems perspective of eyes, trying to help somebody understand the idea, it's that everything that we have, let's say we have a goal. Um, it could be any kind of a goal, but there are things that either reinforce accomplishment of the goal or things that balance, and they might, if you might think of counterbalancing, it works against accomplishing the goal. And so a really simple way to look at life is this systems perspective that says, if I want to do this or become this. Or achieve this, then these are things that reinforce, and then I wanna bolster those, right. I wanna have more of those things that reinforce. And then I, I look and say, these are the things that balance that work against. And I want to try to remove those or weaken those things that work against me. And if we do that, rather than focusing on the end, what we're doing is aligning the systems and those balancing and supporting forces to move us towards our goal. And it becomes very natural. It's not like I'm working harder to get this goal, right. Um, that leads to burnout. You know, I'm gonna work more hours or I'm gonna spend more time on it. It's really a matter of creating more reinforcing and reducing or eliminating those balancing forces. And then. Kind of magically happened. It's a very powerful perspective and it respects that everything is connected. And I really like that. And I think it's very powerful.

Magic Barclay:

That is very powerful. And yes, look off air. We were talking about systems and we're certainly going to talk about it more coming up, but systems in life are so important. Listeners. You not only have the systems in your body, which, you know, I've spoken about to no end, but systems in life systems in business, you know, there's that old saying, if you fail to plan, then you plan to. That planning is systems putting them in place. And whether you're looking at your health at your wealth, at your weight, loss, your relationships, no matter what it is, you need those systems.

David Edwards:

It's exactly right. And it, and it's empowering. I think, to look at things that way it gets us out of ruminating on what my problems are, which is generally not very productive. And it gets us out of our fears, you know, which is focused on the past. And it puts us squarely in the captain's chair of our life that says, okay, there are systems that just exist. I don't have to like it. I don't have to believe in it. I don't have to want it. It just exists. It is no matter what. And so I can just have to try to influence those factors and then I'm gonna see progress. And I think it's, it's, uh, it's very empowering, no matter what your circumstances are, anybody can do this at a very small level. If you have, you have quite a lot of limitations in your circumstances or at a larger level, if you have, have you have fewer constraints,

Magic Barclay:

Agreed now, David, we talk about wealth here. So when we talk about wealth, it's not just the financial, but also the emotional wealth, spiritual wealth, I guess you could call wealth growth or, well, we know, I love the word accelerate. And so do you so acceleration of facets of life that all creates wealth. So what are your top three tips to creating wealth?

David Edwards:

So I think my first tip is to try to avoid external definitions of what your own personal goal using that broader definition is. So for example, if you, you know, a lot, there's lots of influences. I, in some of my research, I think it was that we have about 3000 images that come across our consciousness or even not our consciousness, our subconsciousness, uh, they're in front of us throughout the day. and a lot of these are advertising oriented that somebody's trying to market something to us, but the fact that somebody markets something to us doesn't mean that that's important to us or that it really matters or that we would care about it. And unfortunately a lot of people allow their focus to be on these external measures or images or perspectives of what makes them wealthy, whether that be personal financial, emotional health wise, whatever. Um, and so I think to look at and understand an awareness of if you will, of your own individual circumstances and then trying to influence within that sphere. So scientists or psychologists call this an internal locus of control. And I kinda hate fancy words that basically is this mental model that says who's in charge of my life, the outside world. Now the outside world could be important. People like your spouse or your children or your parents, right. But it could be some random marketing person or some star athlete or some, whatever, any anybody from the outside. So like, are they responsible for my life and my success, my acceleration, my wealth, or am I and evidence, you know, time and time again, an endless studies for decades now have all shown that if we recognize that we're in charge of our own efforts, our own focus, how we define wealth and how we pursue it, then the better off we're gonna be. I think that's my number one tip. That's a very long tip. Sorry.

Magic Barclay:

Just on that. So many people live going well, because that person did this. Then I had to do this or because, okay, sorry, listeners, you know my feelings on government, but here comes because the government said this, then I can't do this. Or, you know, there's, there's always a flow on effect kind of rebound effect way of living. And I really love that. You've said that, you know, you have to pay attention to your individual circumstances because you are an individual listeners. It doesn't matter what those external influences do. Say the message they put out there. It's how you respond and you are in charge of how you respond. So someone could do something or the government could say something, but how you respond to it is what's important. And we've certainly seen a lot of this recently, David, with people going, I can't go and see my Nana in the old aged home because someone said so. Okay. But what about Nana she's alone? You know, she has no idea that the TV told you something, so you're not there. She just knows you're not there. Your response is your response. Sorry, rant over

David Edwards:

that's okay. It's, it's really, it's important to reinforce because it's kind of a default. Um, again, I don't wanna use fancy terms here. Not that I'm particularly fancy person, but, uh, there was some brilliant scientist researchers, psychologists, in Israel who 20, 30 years ago published results and they talked about. We have two systems, there's like a default system. And then there's a more kind of thoughtful system. And most of our lives are spent in this default system. Uh, and you know, most of the time it's okay. Right. It's a way that we preserve energy in our body, in our brain. Um, as long as our defaults are in fact functional, the challenge of the problem comes in is when those defaults are not functional, they're dysfunctional or they work against us and so then we need to, and those instances, we to engage their brain in a more thoughtful process, they call 'em system one and system two. As we go through, you know, our lives, we are very wise and if we, this is maybe the second thing and I. Is that we spend some time, every day being thoughtful, you know, we can think about our lives and think about maybe it, I like a pattern of I'm intentional in the morning. And I'm accountable in the evening. So I have some intent about what I wanna do, who I want to be during the day in the evening. I have some accountability. So I spend a few minutes, this isn't fancy are you're not flogging yourself or anything like that mentally or physically. Um, but we say, well, how did I do this was my intent this morning. And how did I do? And we have a chance to think about and really engage that prefrontal cortex, that executive center of our brain and say, well, I did pretty good in this and I didn't do so good in that. You know, I maybe lost my temper or maybe I, um, was unkind or maybe I, you know, wonder if it is, you know, that you're thinking about, um, I missed an opportunity, um, or I ate that. I don't know if they have donuts in Australia. I assume so, but I had a donut when I didn't really want to, um, You know, there's anyway, so you just kind of do that process and it requires us to be in that thinking mode at least for a few minutes every day.

Magic Barclay:

Perfect. And yes, we do have donuts here in Australia. We have all the fattening foods that you guys have, and yes, we ignore a lot of the healthy ones too. so of course. Great. So that's two tips. What else would you say to the listeners about creating wealth?

David Edwards:

I think the third one. It kind of relates to the other two, but I think it's an important, additional concept. It is to live your life intentionally what I find in the us. Um, but it was similar in Africa and it was similar in Europe. I've never been to Australia someday. That would be a, a lovely thing. But, uh, and maybe it's similar there. You can tell me, but, uh, once we leave high school, you know, we're on our own. Up until that point, we had our parents, we had teachers, we had counselors, we had all these people kind of helping to guide us, helping us hopefully to point us in a good direction. And, but once you graduate though, it's like the world's world has, you're an adult now, congratulations, you know, you're on your own. And all of a sudden. Many of these supports kind of disappear and we have to figure out what we're gonna do, who we're gonna become. What's important to us and, and we have to be intentional about it. and the alternative of course is to drift, drifting leaves you wherever the tide is going, which is not likely where you really want to be, but without intent that's inevitably what happens. And so we see people that are in their twenties and thirties and forties and beyond who are just drifting through life. And so I think really critical that you spend some time being intentional about, well, what do I wanna do? And what do I want to become? Which I think is probably the more important of those two questions. And then you start to live your life according to that, and you apply that internal locus of control. Um, and you apply systems thinking to that intent and voila. Some really good things will happen.

Magic Barclay:

True. That I think Australia used to be a country of drifters. Like it was kind of the, she'll be right, mate. Let's go with the flow kind of attitude. It's become less like that since the eighties. and certainly now we have people going, well, this is what I believe in. This is what I stand for. And everyone seems shocked because that's not a conversation that was had before. You know, it was like, go to school, you might go to uni or you might get a job. You know, whatever happens, happens. It's like, let's go with the flow. And we are not that anymore. And that monumental shift in the collective ethos in Australia has been quite strange to actually observe. So, you know, very different to the us in that respect.

David Edwards:

Interesting. Well, and I, I don't know that, that, I mean, I see some of that in the us. I mean, from the eighties again, I was alive in the eighties. and. It's interesting. There's good. And there's bad with any of these kinds of trends that I see. I mean, you know, the bad of it is that I felt like in the us, at least we, we really focused on the material side of things. So how much money you make, the kind of car you drive, the kind job you've got your status in society that became much more pronounced. And this idea of living an average, common life that's satisfying and fulfilling and happy, has been subsumed by this obsession to be Beyonce. And it's like, well, there's only one Bailon Beyonce though. And if you have to be that to be happy and fulfilled and feel like you're successful, well, I'm really sorry. That's gonna be a tough road for virtually almost everyone. And so, I think the good side of it is that people are saying, I don't want to just fill in this mode, you know, this kind of normal kind of society's predetermined model of what's. Okay. And we're willing to question some things and I think questioning is good. Right? And that's the good side of that. Well, some things that have never been good that we didn't even talk about, you know, we're able to talk about now and I think that's really healthy, but we need to do that in a way that is. Enabling that, is focused on things that we can do and allows us to make decisions in a more effective way so that we are leading our own lives. And there's a good side to that. So, you know, there's always a good kind of a bad side to these things. It seems like.

Magic Barclay:

And I think that's where systems come into play as well. David. So, you know, a lot of people have lived without implementing a system. And so you were saying, you know, people want to be Beyonce or the rock or whoever they wanna be, but they never will be. But the system they try and live by is the system that Beyonce or the rock or whoever would live by. It's not a system that's suitable to them. And certainly here in Australia, like I said, we had that, she'll be right mate. Kind of. Attitude for so long with zero systems in play whatsoever. And so, you know, people just did drift and, and now that they're not, we do have a lot of us influence. So, you know, the kids, these days are saying, I wanna be rich, like so and so, but they don't have a system for it. You know, I wanna be a famous musician, but where's your system? What are you following? What do you stand for? And what things do you do every day to get you there? And the same goes for their health. We've become a very doctor reliant society here, much to my dismay. And you know, the doctors don't even have a system they're run by our Medicare, which is like our government paid government funded. Health service, but they're run by Medicare to see, you know, like someone every two and a half minutes. So their system is to get paid, not necessarily to make you healthy. And you are thinking they're running by a system to get you healthy. So there's no correlation between our needs and our wants, and we are not putting the right systems in play. We're not taking that, that autonomy of our health or autonomy of our wealth, even autonomy of our family life. Like there's just, there seems to be nothing there. That drifting is still a thing.

David Edwards:

There you go. That's, that's interesting that you say. I believe in transparency is one of my core values. And so you need to know that I worked in that healthcare system for 35 years. Uh, and I was a part of that. And as we think about systems thinking of related concept is something called our mental models or, or, you know, and we can think of how mental models relate to our systems. I don't wanna get too far. I feel here. So you reign me in cuz I tend to drift off sometimes. But, uh, so we think about our mental models. I worked with a lot of physicians. And what I discovered over time was that for the most part is I got to know them as individual. These were caring, thoughtful, super bright people who had sacrificed a tremendous amount of time and energy and their lives for training. So they could to help a scope of skills to help people. But once they graduated and even as a part of their training, they learn some mental models. And so they feel constrained to work within this system. We talk about, you know, balancing and reinforcing structures, right. Or systems. So they feel, and most of 'em don't even think about it this way, but they are in fact, operating within this mental model. This is in order for me to make a living. In the us, it's kind of like pay off my school debts and be able to, you know, make a good living and save for retirement and all those things. This is what I've gotta do, cuz that's what the system is set up to do. So if it's a five minute visit and I gotta see 40 of those in a day, then that's what I'm gonna do. And I'll, I'll do my best within that. But of course they never quite get beyond the idea of wait a minute, this is not producing the results that I would hope for that I desire for these patients who come to me for help and what I gonna do about it, you know, how do I change the system so that we in fact do get the results that we all want, which is to be a healthier, more capable, group of people. I finished working at a heart Institute, so specialty and subspecialty care, um, which I loved, however, um, because we were very focused on our mission and the prevention and research side of things, as well as the kind of care processes. But when I left, I thought I wanna be a part of something that's more holistic. And I actually over time after going to Africa for a while, I went to work for a tribal health. So an indigenous government sponsored, so native American, a tribal health group in Alaska, which is, you know, in the Northern above Canada there. and, it was a wonderful experience for me because they really tried to look at a person as a whole person. There is a social context, there's a cultural context, there's the physical and the mental context. And within those, you know, there's all the little subgroups Western medicine. We love reductionism, right? So one person looks at the eyes. Another one looks at the brain. Another one looks at the, the arms or the legs or the heart or whatever. So we love this kind of reductionist model, but in the pursuit of that, which has some, a marvelous advantages, we've forgotten that everything is connected, right? The body is in fact a system. And anytime we touch one thing, it affects the others. And we've kind of lost that. And I felt like this group was moving us or trying to practice. In that allopathic medical model with an expanded lens. And so we had things like a sweat lodge, there's nothing allopathic, you know, kind of Western medicine model it really about addressing kind of the cultural aspect of our health, our wellness of our wealth, if you will. and so we are trying to incorporate more of that and look at how all these things were intertwined. And then I spent the rest of my career really trying to pursue this model of whole person, integrated, coordinated, systemic care that engages with the individual patient. We talked about that internal locus of control or being your own captain, you know, that tried to put the person, the individual as a captain of their life. And so if it is. What we would in America call some alternative medicine. It might be herbals. It might be, um, energy therapy, or it might, you know, whatever else, as well as maybe some things with drugs, you know, or with, um, physical exercise or mental exercise or therapy or you're right. We wanna have them coordinating and being in charge of all these things. Cause nobody knows them like they do. And we should respect that and honor that and engage with them in that way to put them in charge and treat them in that way, which is a huge challenge. Cuz our traditional model is the doctor's in charge and you're a good patient. If you do what they tell you to. and there's wisdom in that way. And we need to respect what doctor or the nurse or the holistic therapist or the mental health therapist or whatever advises us to do. But we need to then think about what they do and say, does this work in my life, in my circumstances, knowing all the other things that are going on, cuz I guarantee if you go to multiple people, they don't know what the other people are suggesting or talking about or doing really you do. You're the only one that understands that maybe that was a ranch on my side.

Magic Barclay:

No, I love that rant. And I'm just going to wrap that rant up with, by saying I see a lot of patients in my clinic that have been to multiple other professionals. And for me to start even thinking about working with a patient, they have to fill out a 12 page intake. And I get the whole truth on that form. And then some, because there's stuff they don't put on that form that with them, when we do our intake consult, they go, oh, I dunno if it's important. But when I was three, this happened, I didn't put it on my form. So I'll say everything's important, but I can see who they've worked with because I ask them. And when I'm talking to the client, even before I started working with them, I'll say, so, did this doctor know that you then went to that doctor? And then you took this medication cuz you know, three of those medications contraindicate each other. And that might be why you are. Feeling so awful. And they're like, no, it wasn't their business for me to tell them, well, where's your accountability. You know, you have to take personal accountability. If you're going to doctor shop professional, shop nurse, shop, medication, shop, whatever you are doing, where's your accountability and your transparency, as you said before. And then where is your personal level of belief? And you mentioned values before. We'll talk more about that in our next episode, but are you not valuing yourself as the client, as the patient, as the subject, whatever you wanna, you know, see yourself as to be transparent and accountable anyway, there's my ran on that. Yeah.

David Edwards:

And I guess, and I think about, you know, we think about, you know, we want to be helpful to people. I mean, and I really think that is. Maybe that as we think about our health and our wealth broadly, this idea that I'm in charge of my life is so fundamental. And we don't think about it. And there are very few people that encourage us to think about it because it's not a road to make them more money or to have, have, have more influence over us. But it's so fundamentally important to every other good thing we wanna do. And for me, you know, I'm thinking about our audience, which I know you care deeply about. Um, it's this idea that you are in charge of your life and it is important. And if they can just get a sense of that and, and feel like, I think that's right, right. This glimmer of hope that wow, if they haven't thought about it before, you know that like, wow, I think that's true. So then what can I start to do different. And I think that would be a marvelous, amazing, powerful, accelerating idea for people

Magic Barclay:

could not agree more. Now, David, I have one final question for this episode and that is around weight loss. If you have ever battled your weight, what was a trigger to lose it? Or what can you offer the listeners around this subject?

David Edwards:

so it's funny as you say that we talk about battling. Um, I've never in a way battled my weight or like gained a bunch of weight than lost back. That kind of CSAW, I've been much more consistent, which is typical of us as we age. Um, I'm 61 and what happens over our lives is unless we take specific steps to maintain, uh, healthy. Active productive weight. Um, we will continue to gain weight throughout our lives, um, because we, especially after, I don't remember exactly, I'd say mid thirties or so, you know, the normal way the human body works is that barring any other interventions we will in fact put on weight. That's the normal thing. If we don't change anything. And so how do I say this? So two things, I guess one is that my weight is not correlated to my self esteem and I think that's so important. Um, even as I have gained weight, I don't think I'm a terrible person because of it. And I don't pay a lot of attention to all the dieting ads I dunno about in Australia, but in the United States, there is a like, 200 billion industry on weight loss, which is a total fixed game. I'm gonna stop there cuz I would go on a rant for myself, what I've realized, trying to think of this as a system is that in my life, if I don't change things, as I get older, then my inevitable result is what has happened is to gain. Now I've not gained so much weight that I'm dysfunctional, I'm quite functional, active, energetic, and quite happy. Thank you very much, but I way more than I think I should not because somebody told me I'm overweight or fat or whatever, but because I know that for myself, given my values and my goals, I want to remain viable and of service until the day I die. Ideally, which I hope isn't a long time from now. And so how do I manage the systems in my life so that I can maintain that? And at this point I would like to lose some weight, not a lot of weight, but I'm, I mean, some like maybe 20 pounds not to meet a goal that's artificial or somebody else set for me, but to a weight that I think I can be that viable, sustainable person of service. Until the day I die. And so I'm starting to change things. So for example, I'm walking every day for 40 minutes to an hour. I think that's something I can do hopefully for the rest of my life. And it's, it does all kinds of benefits, which I'm sure you could illuminate, um, much more than I could. Um, but it's a systemic. Response, if you will, me trying to be intentional to say, this is something that I enjoy doing that I can do. I said, cues that I'm reminded to do it. Um, and it's going to help me maintain a more healthy weight and physical and mental status throughout my life. I've changed, for example, from whole milk to 2%, to 1% to now I only ever drink skim when I drink milk. And so I'm, again, we look at this from a systems perspective, there's balancing and reinforcing factors. Now I'm trying to address individual factors and where I'm in a point of trying to lose a little weight to manage a healthier, sustainable weight. I'm having to do a few more things. For example, I dramatically reduced amount of meat that I'm needing, especially any kind of processed meat, because of all kinds of, I guess, fairly obvious reasons. So it's a matter of looking at systems and, you know, I've stopped gaining weight. I've lost, I think about eight pounds over the last several months. and I'll continue to look at systemic solutions or systemic influences to try to balance and get to a point where I can, you know, sustain and keep moving forward. And that's kind of how I look at it.

Magic Barclay:

Fantastic. Now, David people can find you@wwwdotdavidredwards.com. You're also on Facebook. You have a YouTube you're on and your book, which we'll talk more about in our next episode is available on Amazon. So amazon.com/author/ David R. Edwards. Now. In 1 26 listeners. So in our next episode, David will rejoin us. We will talk about his fantastic book and yes, we will talk a little bit more about systems because we love them so much and really wanna share that, that wealth of knowledge with you. So listeners thank you again for your time today. Go forth and create your magical life.