A Magical Life: Health, Wealth, and Weight Loss

Safety, Identity, and Your Diet with Matty Lansdown

September 27, 2023 Matty Lansdown Season 1 Episode 224
Safety, Identity, and Your Diet with Matty Lansdown
A Magical Life: Health, Wealth, and Weight Loss
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A Magical Life: Health, Wealth, and Weight Loss
Safety, Identity, and Your Diet with Matty Lansdown
Sep 27, 2023 Season 1 Episode 224
Matty Lansdown

Matty is a scientist and nutritionist who works with busy women and moms to set them free from the fad diet yo-yo.  Focusing on calorie input versus output isn't enough for long-term lifestyle change.

Matty's work has brought him from vaccine development to dietitian training around to where he is now.  Many diseases like cancer, dementia, and diabetes are largely caused by diet, lifestyle, and tobacco.  But, he found that just telling people what to eat wasn't enough.  Being overweight is not about food, calories or kale, it’s about peeling the emotional onion and growing into a totally new version of yourself.

Learn more about working with Matty and his podcast "How To Not Get Sick and Die" at https://mattylansdown.com/

Support the Show.

Connect with Magic:
A Magical Life Podcast on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/amagicallifepodcast/
On Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/wholisticnaturalhealth/
Online: https://wholisticnaturalhealth.com.au
A Subito Media production

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Show Notes Transcript

Matty is a scientist and nutritionist who works with busy women and moms to set them free from the fad diet yo-yo.  Focusing on calorie input versus output isn't enough for long-term lifestyle change.

Matty's work has brought him from vaccine development to dietitian training around to where he is now.  Many diseases like cancer, dementia, and diabetes are largely caused by diet, lifestyle, and tobacco.  But, he found that just telling people what to eat wasn't enough.  Being overweight is not about food, calories or kale, it’s about peeling the emotional onion and growing into a totally new version of yourself.

Learn more about working with Matty and his podcast "How To Not Get Sick and Die" at https://mattylansdown.com/

Support the Show.

Connect with Magic:
A Magical Life Podcast on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/amagicallifepodcast/
On Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/wholisticnaturalhealth/
Online: https://wholisticnaturalhealth.com.au
A Subito Media production

Magic Barclay:

Welcome back to A Magical Life. I'm your host, Magic Barclay, and today Matty Lansdown joins us. He is a scientist, nutritionist, and an emotional eating and self sabotage coach that specializes in weight loss and self confidence for women and busy mums. Boy, don't we all need that. Starting out in a field of nutritional epigenetics. And spending several years working in hospitals as part of a disease research team, Maddy believes that most disease and illness is not due to bad luck, but as a result of poor nutrition and lifestyle choices. Maddy's extensive experience allowed him to uncover the deeper challenge people have with health, which isn't about calories or kale, but in fact mindset and behavior change. Having been on his own personal development journey, Maddy is now super passionate about showing people how to level up their health so that healthy habits and the best food choices are easy and natural. Likewise, Maddy's weekly podcast, How to Not Get Sick and Die, provides his followers and clients with a deep dive into nutrition and how to develop healthy habits that last. Welcome Maddy. Hey Magic, how are you? I am so good. I'm so glad we connected through a previous guest and, uh, you know, welcome to a magical life. Yeah.

Matty Lansdown:

I'm excited to have a bit of a conversation and, uh, see where we go with this.

Magic Barclay:

Exactly. And, as a busy mum, I'm so glad you're

Matty Lansdown:

here. Oh, well, I'm glad to hear that. I get a lot of people saying like, Maddie, you're, you know, a man without children and you work with busy mums, like, how does that work?

Magic Barclay:

Because you've got time to look from the outside

Matty Lansdown:

in. Totally. Well, the other thing is like, have you ever had a male doctor? It's like, you know, does, does gender really matter? But, um, yeah, no, totally. I've got some space to care for the mums that don't have space to care for themselves. I

Magic Barclay:

love that. Okay. So I'm going to ask you my standard three questions because everyone gives me different answers and it's really quite amazing. So your first one, what can your expertise do to accelerate health? Not just physical, but also emotional and spiritual health.

Matty Lansdown:

That's a good question. So I think, well, at least the work that I do specifically with busy mums and women is probably mostly emotional and spiritual because it fundamentally allows people a space to investigate themselves, uh, and get to know themselves and bring a lot of automated things that they've been doing for many years. into their awareness, which is often an uncomfortable and confronting process, because a lot of those things that we've been doing for a long time, especially if they're talking to me are not helpful things. Um, and so, you know, there's all of these different behaviors and cycles and little addictions, uh, that occur in our day to day life, uh, whether it be a recurring argument in a relationship, whether it be sugar, whether it be a lack of, you know, nutrition and food, Poor sleep, stress management, that type of thing. It brings all of these things into your awareness. and it's funny, last night on our group coaching call with my clients, I actually said that the one thing I can guarantee is that you can never unknow what you learn here. because Most other health programs just focus on the material, right, which is the food or the supplements, and unless we bring into one's awareness the actual, you know, way that you conduct yourself in a day to day life, you can't change anything. It's like getting out of your car on the side of the highway and being like, the car's broken. And never looking under the hood, right. To know actually which part is broken and what do we need to do with it? And how is it broken? And can we swap it out for another part? It's just like the car's broken. So I'm kind of lost. So yeah, I think it helps bring, all of these factors into somebody's awareness to realize where they're going wrong in their own journey and where they can make changes, so that they can start moving their health in a positive direction. And that's difficult in the beginning because, I guess, you know, it's uncomfortable. A lot of the truths that we come up with are really confronting and it's like, oh, wow, I'm my worst enemy. I should change that. so. It just puts people in the driver's seat. And I think Western medicine has really convinced everybody that they're a victim to their genetics. And this process really puts people in the driver's seat of being aware of what they're doing, aware of how that affects them, and therefore gives them the capacity to take control. Well

Magic Barclay:

said. And just a side note to that, Western medicine. Relies on everything being the patient's fault. They don't know the answer straight away. It's idiopathic. It's of no known cause you've brought it on yourself. You know, like you want to lose weight, just diet and exercise. That's not always the situation. They're not looking for the root cause. They're looking for who can I

Matty Lansdown:

blame? Totally. Totally. And, and, you know, there's so many people that are, you know, whether it be, you know, weight loss is obviously a very, um, fundamental example that many people want to lose weight, but you know, they can be eating the salads and going to the gym and sitting in front of the doctor and being like, I'm actually doing all of the right things. And it's not working. And the doctor would be like, Oh, well, you're just eating too much fat. Are you doing this? Are you doing that? When the reality is now they're getting even less sleep than they were getting before because they're getting up to get to the gym. totally deficient of protein. Um, and so like You know, you can be doing all the right things or believe you are and still be blamed for the lack of results. And, and so I think, yeah, what, I mean, what needs to happen as we know, I guess many of the listeners of this show would know is a complete overhaul of the system. And, that's a macro economic problem, which can't happen overnight, but conversations like this edges forward just one more percent, I think. True

Magic Barclay:

that. That's all I can say. Yeah. Now, my second question is about wealth. So, people think wealth is just the financial, but it can also be personal and emotional wealth. What are your top three tips to creating any kind of wealth?

Matty Lansdown:

Good question. Number one would be consistency. whether it be wealth in emotional relationships, happiness within yourself, joy, abundance, any of those feelings that you want to cultivate or actual financial wealth. The one thing that I keep learning on my own personal development journey is consistency. Keep showing up every single day, you know, keep collecting data, which is either You know, continue getting in the ring and then having the battles that you need to have in order to progress in the right direction or continue learning or continue, you know, challenging yourself. But the most important thing is being consistent. It's not intensity. A lot of people think it's intensity, like, and that's how we approach diet culture and even healing journeys is that we dive in the deep end and like, Oh, I've got, I can't eat chocolate ever again. And Oh my God, go hard willpower. And then it falls apart in a couple of weeks. It's like that, Sort of famous analogy is that, you know, you can go to the gym for nine hours today and come home and look in the mirror and nothing will have changed. Actually, the only thing that will have changed is your face looking super tired. but it's, about, not going super intense for a very tiny period of time. It's about showing up every day and, and understanding that the variation of intensity will be high some days, will be low some days, but it's the consistency, the frequency of progressing, across time. And collecting, you know, 2 percent this day, 5 percent that day, 1 percent this day, as you move forward to cultivate that wealth, I think that consistently showing up for yourself and for the people in your world and in the ways that you want to create wealth is fundamentally the most important thing to create anything that you want. Well

Magic Barclay:

said. All right. So the final standard question is about weight loss. Have you ever battled your weight? And if so, what was the trigger to beating that kind of weight? And what can you offer the listeners in their weight loss journeys?

Matty Lansdown:

Yeah, it's an interesting question. Cause I often work with a lot of, weight loss, clients or people looking to lose weight. And I have not really ever been on a weight loss journey. I mean, in the last couple of years, totally honest about my journey and the food that I eat online. like I definitely had some emotional eating challenges, which is. ironic since I'm an emotional eating coach, but that's the reason I know how to do this is I've found myself down that wormhole many times over my life, dealing with trauma and using food to cope. And, you know, there was, depending on which rabbit hole you've been down and you know, there was a few moments, a significant moments of ultimate despair for me in the last year. And there was family suicides and there was a lot going on. And so I think if actually a time that I've ever battled my weight. If I was to really put it down to that, it would probably be right now. and what I mean by that is not that I'm necessarily looking to, I really don't have much weight to lose. It's a very small amount, but it's the most unhappy I've ever been with my body. However. I know that it's just consistency, right? I know, I know how to do it. I've got my own support networks and my own people in my corner that helped me because I really believed in the idea that the coach needs a coach. and if I was perfect, then I'd be God. And well, that's not the case, right? and so I'm a human too. Uh, and the last few years were so Super tough running a small business and that type of thing, but yeah, I've never, never been overweight. I've been very fortunate. Having said that, um, that doesn't mean that I haven't eaten copious amounts of terrible food and sugar and vegetable oils, definitely did. And even though all of the Lansdowne men in my family never really gained weight. That's just kind of a genetic thing. All of them, my grandfathers, my uncles, my dad, they have all had surgery on their guts because of how much crap they put in. And I was also edging towards that outcome myself. So even though weight loss is the thing that everybody else. We'll notice as, you know, judging someone as healthy or unhealthy, you know, skinny people aren't necessarily healthy. Their body just might not store fat in the same way that it does for you. And I can guarantee I spent years, going to the toilet, and bleeding every single time because of the horrific food that I was putting in. So, you know, it can be a bit of a bit of an illusion from the outside as to how somebody's health journey is going. But, um, yeah, if I was to say talking about weight. Now's probably the time. However, you know, I'm talking, I'm talking tiny amounts of weight. We're talking like I want to lose three to five kilos. So, you know, I feel like a bit of a fraud saying that.

Magic Barclay:

Never feel like a fraud. You know, your journey is your journey. And I love your raw honesty. Thank you.

Matty Lansdown:

Oh, you're more

Magic Barclay:

than welcome. So I think many people think, you know, maybe if I just eat the right things, do what I'm told, you know, the weight will drop off and they compare themselves to maybe their best friend who might be super slim, but it's really the internal stuff going on that matters and you may be eating all the right things. And that may be great and you're not losing weight, and it could be a number of reasons, but by comparing yourself to the skinny person next to you, you know, you may be actually a lot healthier than them. So I just love that

Matty Lansdown:

distinction. Yeah. And I think it's really important because, we're all in such different situations and what happens behind closed doors is not something that anybody else is aware of, right? So, obviously there's going to be a degree at which point being overweight also needs attention, because that, you know, affects people's health, in a negative way. But, yeah, I think we're on our own journey and as long as we're moving forward, you know, comparison is not really helpful.

Magic Barclay:

Now, Maddie, I really want to open the floor to what it is that you do. So you have a number of groups on Facebook and you're a coach. Tell us about the coaching that you do. Tell us about, well, we've heard your bio, but tell us a bit more about your journey into why this is important to you and what you want the listeners to know about. The things that you do every day.

Matty Lansdown:

Yeah, sure. Thanks. I appreciate the opportunity to share about this. So I guess, so I started out in a cancer hospital. well, I mean, in the early, early, early beginning, I started out as a vaccine formulation scientist and then I worked in a nutritional epigenetics company. but my longest stint in my scientific career was and you know, there were. All amazing geniuses and super fantastic, all the doctors and PhDs and everybody that I worked with, they were so amazing and impressive. And the interesting thing was that I went on this journey of, being just a naive, you know, early twenties, scientist of Starting my job at the cancer hospital, which I didn't particularly expect to get the job because I didn't totally fulfill the, requirements for the position, but, I'm fortunate that in the world of scientists, I have, the ability to communicate, you know, relatively coherently. and so, I was able to talk my way in, which was great. And from there, I. I literally thought, Oh, I should learn about cancer. So I started, you know, researching cancer, not in my job, but like me sort of holistically getting a, like sort of 30, 000 foot view of like, what is cancer? How does everybody view cancer? Um, and I started on the world health organization website and the first sentence on the cancer page said, 90 to 95 percent of cancers are caused by diet, lifestyle, and tobacco. And so I was just kind of, you know, Like, this is a bit confusing, since I work in a building that cost one billion dollars to build and there's no food, nutrition, diet, lifestyle department. I mean, yes, hospitals have dieticians, but, uh, I would argue that they're... Mostly misguided in the, the, the way that they, um, give nutrition advice and in a cancer context, the only nutrition advice that's really focused on is calories, um, and calories in regards to the fact that chemotherapy, radiation, surgery is a really intense journey. So we really just need as much energy as we can get to put into the body. and so obviously the most energy dense or calorie rich foods, Pizzas, ice cream, chocolate, sugars, refined carbohydrates, which I think are awful foods to put into the body if you are also undergoing toxic pharmaceutical treatment. Now that doesn't mean that that treatment doesn't have a place, but I always think of it like this, is that the liver interprets things in two ways. Toxin. Nutrient. There's no in between. So if you put in chemotherapy and then follow it up with refined sugars and carbohydrates, the liver just interprets all of it as a toxic load, which is, you don't want to add to the toxic load when you're on any type of health journey. So this beginning of me being like, what? Like, why is this not a building of diet and lifestyle sent me down the path of researching Western medicine, the history of Western medicine, because from day one, for me, there was a, there was a disconnect. And I even asked my professor, why don't we do diet and lifestyle? And he laughed and said, Matty, if it was that simple. We would have figured it out by now. and so from there, I just went on my own deep dive and I eventually became a nutritionist in the process because I felt that I had uncovered so much truth that has been hidden from the mainstream, that has been redirected by doctors having a prestigious status in society. And so whenever somebody says something that's not truthful. in line with what a doctor says. They're basically regarded as hippie or woo woo or, you know, disconnected or whatever it might be. Um, and so I began to be disillusioned with the environment that I was in and feeling like a bit of an imposter and, and being like, how can I be the only one that sees this? You know, I'm surrounded by such geniuses. and then I'd be walking in and out of, clinic and the laboratory and, you know, all through the wards every single day. And it was... It was clearly visible to me that basically everybody was overweight. and so I went from like, okay, these people have got cancer, which is like unfortunate genetic luck. And then I learned that actually most of them don't have bad luck. And then I observed that everybody was overweight. And I went and did my own little research study on my phone one day. And my job sort of, I went in and out of a couple of different hospitals. And I. Walked through every single ward that I had access to and just counted the people in clinic and counted the people in beds, that visibly to me looked to be overweight. Now, obviously, this is not a real study, but it's me just collecting data. and I collected several hundred patients worth of data, uh, and about 88 percent of them were visibly overweight to me. and so this confirmed exactly what appears in the research, which is that, um, being. overweight or obese is a precursor to get diabetes, cancer, Alzheimer's, dementia, you know, insert modern disease that people die from, basically. And so at this point, I was like, okay, become a nutritionist, tell everybody what to eat, save the world. It's, it's that easy. And so I did that. And, um, I spoke at, at events overseas in multiple different countries, wellness events, retreats, business events, conferences, and realized that Basically, everybody knew what to eat. and they actually knew like meat and vegetables was a pretty good idea. And they knew that chocolate for breakfast was probably not a good idea. Like generally they knew in broad categories, what to do and what not to do. So I was like, why don't you do it then? And that's what led me to the work that I do today with emotional eating and, uh, self sabotage work is that. Most people know what they're doing, but they can't answer the question, Why can't I stick to the diet? Or why can't I do what's good for me? And that's where we have to dig deep into the identity and the personality and the behaviors of that individual so that we can give them the tools to be able to actually make change for themselves, because it's far deeper than just eat this. Now, of course, sugar is addictive. We should acknowledge that. There are foods that are addictive through the fact that they are addictive in the cell, but also produce the dopamine response that we get addicted to as well. But most of the work is deep emotional identity work that then leads to behavior change. And it's not easy. it's uncomfortable. It's difficult. it has to be done slowly in order for you to not be overwhelmed and just abandon ship. but that's what got me to what I do now. And so that's why I work with women and busy moms, because. Dealing with that emotional eating piece or the true driver of poor decision making so that we can understand it, unpack it, give it some love, some attention, some care, some respect. It could be past trauma. It could be just being programmed by the sugar industry for 50 years. It could be a thing that happened when you started a relationship and food was the way you connected. There's so many little things that it could be, and we need to acknowledge it. We need to either do two things, right? We need a set of tools that allow us to continue to manage that situation with healthier alternatives. And when I say that I don't actually mean food most of the time, and we also need to create a space to process some of that stuff that we're holding onto. and so throughout my program, We start with the psychology, emotional eating mindset stuff and we do that. We don't even talk about food for the first month, before we get to the nutrition piece. Cause I really believe the body and the mind should be worked on together, because one inherently affects the other. So in a nutshell, that's basically how I ended up here today and what we do with, uh, women and busy mums.

Magic Barclay:

Okay. So a lot going on there, but we talk about cancer a lot here because I'm a cancer survivor myself and have been overweight, gotten back to the right size and then gotten overweight again. So there is a lot of truth there in the fact that dietitians. Give incorrect or poor advice, not saying all of them. I don't want to hate mail from all the dietitians out there, but certainly in my experience, it was, you're going to be going through a lot with the surgery and everything like this. You've got to keep your calories up. I heard that one several times. And, uh, you know, no one really addressed the emotional aspect of cancer. So when I said, you know, cause I'd never actually been a sugar addict before that. Then I said, I'm attracted to things like ice cream all of a sudden that don't make me feel good, but I can't stop eating them. They were like, Oh yeah, it's comfort eating. You're going through a lot. That'll stop. And you know, so how do we decipher the messages? Like I talk a lot on this podcast and certainly in my own practice, that's what we do. Look at root cause, you know, everything is telling you something, but perhaps when we're busy mums or we're cancer survivors or Going through an illness, how do you suggest people reroute that thought process? Because they've got all this incorrect information being thrown at them, you know, by the media, by mainstream medicine, you know, by a lot of sources, friends, family, how do we decipher what the body needs?

Matty Lansdown:

Yeah, it's a great question. I think, um, and you know, that's a great comment too about the, um, dietitians. Like, they're not all bad, the ones that I used to work with hated seeing me come along because they'd be like, oh, here's this guy that's going to debate with us. And I've had many a debate with dietitians, but of course, you know, all of anybody is not bad and we, and we can't generalize like that. But, um, I think, you know, It's a process is the answer, to decipher that information. But for me, as a biologist, I always default to basically what got us here. The first, you know, depending on your belief systems, the first million years, what got humans the first 10, you know, 10, million years, uh, because We were eating very similarly through those phases, all which fall under the banner of jurf, just eat real food, which came from the earth or from an animal, which also came from the earth. Right? So that should be the default for any diet, for any health journey, anything like that. If it comes in a bag or a box or a can, it's highly likely that it contains things that are unhelpful. and as well, I guess, It's important to make the distinction between a therapeutic response with a diet, so using food as medicine, and then going on just a simple weight loss journey. And I don't mean simple to minimize it, but there's a difference because if we need a therapeutic response, that needs rapid change as soon as possible. Actually just before we jumped on this call, I had somebody reach out that's, um, yeah, new to cancer diagnosis. And in that situation, I would lean towards a therapeutic response, which is like. make changes as fast as possible. However, when we use willpower and we, uh, are setting ourselves up to put ourselves in this extreme environment, uh, often people will last a couple of weeks and then they'll fall apart. They'll fall off the bandwagon, even if they've got a chronic disease diagnosis. And so we want to pace ourselves. At a pace that allows identity change to happen, because that needs to happen in order to show up in the world differently, but not too quickly, that it's so confronting and uncomfortable and feeling unsafe and insecure about who we are, that we just go, stuff it, I'm going back to who I was before, it was easier, it was familiar, it was safe, and that's why many people do things that they know that they shouldn't, But they keep doing them, because academically, the logical part of our brain says, it makes sense that doing things differently would produce a different outcome. And it sounds great. And the deeper part of our brain operates on the devil I know is better than the devil I don't type idea, which is, even though we kind of can figure out that it would be better to do things that way, we're totally safe over here doing things the way we've done them. We haven't died. We haven't, nothing's killed us yet. And so what we must be doing must be good enough to keep things moving forward. And so we have to start getting into that psychology and that way of thinking slowly and progressively in a really safe way. And which is. Why I have the mantra one tweak a week, we want to make small adjustments to that identity. So the identity doesn't freak out and just default back to all of the things that it used to do before, which is why many people have cycled on and off diets for decades, only to be, you know, bigger than they were when they first began in the very beginning, because they dive too far away from who they are, fundamentally, and they freak out. Because they're like, Whoa, there's no safety here. No security here. I don't feel familiar with anything. And so they just go slingshot back. So we need to like one tweak, one small step a week, master that step and then move to the next step. But we also need to understand the cause. So we need to understand the past, why the past has created the present. Because if like you sort of mentioned that with the work you do, you know, cause based medicine, cause based health therapy, that type of thing. Yeah. Ideally, knowing where the problem originated and how to take the power out of it, uh, is going to allow you to then make those steps forward. You've

Magic Barclay:

touched on something very important there that I don't think any other guest has ever said. And it was a light bulb moment for me as you were saying it. And that was identity and weight for me. So, you know, I started off anorexic. And my identity was the super skinny person that never put any weight on cause I didn't allow it to happen. That was my control. And then becoming morbidly obese, my identity then was, you know, the fat person in inverted commas, not making light of that to the listeners, but. You know, I never identify as that now. so yeah, when I was on my weight loss journey, initially that loss of identity was a really big thing. And it was me putting on my fat armor to protect me against someone that was hurting me. So my identity was do not be sexy, do not be approachable, do not be desirable, do everything to not be. And that was kind of real identity crisis. So that was kind of a light bulb moment as you were saying that, that yeah, that's. My behavior from the past and now back on my weight loss journey or weight release journey, that's not a factor. And that's so freeing. So just pointing it out to the listeners that if you had that light bulb moment of, is there a reason why I've gained or lost weight? Is there a reason why I've hidden myself away from my friends and family? You know, I've become an introvert really look at that identity factor.

Matty Lansdown:

Yeah, no, I totally agree. And you know, it can be as high as like one in two women that have experienced sexual assault or sexual abuse or any type of horrible, uncomfortable situation. And there's a bunch of studies out there and the ACE study is one of them too, that talk about, traumatic incidents in childhood or early life and the predictability of things like obesity, cancer, diabetes later in life. And there's a really strong connection. And even though on the, on the surface. The socially acceptable thing is to want to be skinny and to, you know, I want to look good. I want to look like this. And that's a nice reason to sign up to programs and try and lose some weight or go to the gym is that, yeah, if we don't get to that deeper piece of like, I am not succeeding on anything that I do because. Yeah, keeping myself overweight protects me or keeps me in the person that everybody expects me to me, then nothing's ever going to work, which is exactly why everyone that we work with, we start for the first month on digging deep, um, and pulling this apart. And interestingly, some people get there and they're like, you know what, I'm actually happy with this identity and that. That's totally okay. It's not up for me to judge anybody, you know, on the health journey they want to go on. But most people get deep down there and find some really painful stuff. acknowledging it, seeing it, loving it, caring for it, talking to somebody about it, reporting it to police if that's part of the situation, getting a psychologist. You know, whatever it looks like for you, uh, you know, is that's the beginning of that identity shift. And you can start showing up in the world differently, uh, and your family differently. Many people these days, because being overweight is the norm, feel that if they start losing weight, they'll be picked on. And by their own family members as being the skinny one and not looking well anymore, you know, whatever it might be. And so there's all of these factors that play into our identity and our safety in our environment. And, and the people around us control that more than anybody. Um, and so we have to, we have to nurture it slowly.

Magic Barclay:

Very much so. And you mentioned the ACE study. In our practice, we always, with our intake, we include the ACE questionnaire. Mm hmm. And. When I did it for myself, I got a seven out of 10 and I was like, okay, there's some stuff going on here.

Matty Lansdown:

Yeah. It's a, such a powerful study. It is. It's

Magic Barclay:

absolutely fantastic for, so for the listeners, that's the adverse childhood experience questionnaire. It's very standardized questionnaire of 10 questions. And most people should be three and under for a healthy outlook on life. Wow. Okay. Maddie, I'm going to wrap this up. I could talk to you forever and listen to you forever, but I'm going to send the listeners to your groups. So on Facebook, you have the Busy Mothers FB group and you also have Intermittent Fasting FB group. Now Intermittent Fasting, we've spoken a lot on this podcast about, so listeners will know about it. It's also known as time restricted eating. So pop on over to Maddie's group. And deep dive there before I let you go, we love freebies. What can you offer and where can we find it?

Matty Lansdown:

Yeah. So there's a bunch of stuff on my website. So maddylandsdown. com. Um, and for everybody, all the women and mothers that want to come and hang out in our Facebook group. you know, in the mom's Facebook group, we still talk intermittent fasting. We talk all of those things. So, upon entry, you will get some free eBooks and stuff like that. So yeah, come and hang out maddylandsdown. com. Oh, yeah. And the podcast, of course, if you want to listen to me rant some more.

Magic Barclay:

Always. Thank you so much for your time. This has been a great episode.

Matty Lansdown:

Thanks, Magic. I appreciate your time.

Magic Barclay:

Thank you. And listeners, thank you for your time. We really do love the reviews that we're seeing and you know, we'd love interacting with you guys on our Facebook page, which is at a magical life podcast listeners for now, go forth and create your magical life.